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THINGS TO DO IN CALIFORNIA

Death Valley National Park


Hours: [M-S 8am-5pm]          Open: Daily          Cost: [$30 for 7 Days]          Group Size: [Any]
Hours: [M-F 8am-5pm]
 Open: Daily
Cost: [$$$]
Group Size: [15-20]

About Death Valley National Park

Death Valley National Park is the hottest, driest, and lowest National Park in the country. The steady drought and record summer heat make the park a land of extremes. Each extreme has a striking contrast in the area. There are record-breaking heatwaves and towering peaks are frosted with winter snow. Occasionally rainstorms will bring fields of wildflowers, and lush oases harbor tiny fish and refuge for wildlife. Although it is named Death Valley there is a great diversity of life survives in Death Valley.

About Death Valley National Park

Death Valley National Park is the hottest, driest, and lowest National Park in the country. The steady drought and record summer heat make the park a land of extremes. Each extreme has a striking contrast in the area. There are record-breaking heatwaves and towering peaks are frosted with winter snow. Occasionally rainstorms will bring fields of wildflowers, and lush oases harbor tiny fish and refuge for wildlife. Although it is named Death Valley there is a great diversity of life survives in Death Valley.

Activities in Death Valley

Death Valley is a national park with over three million acres of designated Wilderness and hundreds of miles of backcountry roads. The park has an amazing variety of terrain, historic sites, plants, and animals to explore. Many of the famous places in Death Valley can be seen in a car. Some of the most famous places are the Badwater Basin, Tour Artists Drive, Check Out Devils Golf Course, Golden Canyon, and Zabriskie Point. Another popular activity in Death Valley National Park is backpacking. It can be very challenging, but the opportunities for experiencing solitude, sweeping vistas, dark night skies, and awesome geology. There are very few established trails in the park, but many hikers can follow canyon bottoms, open desert washes, alluvial fans, and abandoned dirt roads to get around.

Activities in Death Valley

Death Valley is a national park with over three million acres of designated Wilderness and hundreds of miles of backcountry roads. The park has an amazing variety of terrain, historic sites, plants, and animals to explore. Many of the famous places in Death Valley can be seen in a car. Some of the most famous places are the Badwater Basin, Tour Artists Drive, Check Out Devils Golf Course, Golden Canyon, and Zabriskie Point. Another popular activity in Death Valley National Park is backpacking. It can be very challenging, but the opportunities for experiencing solitude, sweeping vistas, dark night skies, and awesome geology. There are very few established trails in the park, but many hikers can follow canyon bottoms, open desert washes, alluvial fans, and abandoned dirt roads to get around.

Guest Reviews

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100 percent would do it again

The rangers in the bookstore were super helpful, gave me map and directions and told me some places to check out. The park was not crowded at all and very hot so take a lot of water and sunscreen and make sure your car is ready for a lot of miles in the heat. Fun experience and 100 percent would do it again!

-Patrick Leyva, Google

Guest Reviews

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100 percent would do it again

The rangers in the bookstore were super helpful, gave me map and directions and told me some places to check out. The park was not crowded at all and very hot so take a lot of water and sunscreen and make sure your car is ready for a lot of miles in the heat. Fun experience and 100 percent would do it again!

-Patrick Leyva, Google

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Beautiful views, Dante's View was stellar

Easy drive through park, 4 of the 5 sites visited were little or no walk from parking lots. No cell service, so plan route ahead of time and/or download or bring map. Very hot in summer, bring ample water. Beautiful views, Dante's View was stellar.

-Chris Karjanis, Google

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The night sky here is incredible

The seclusion and remoteness in this park are amazing to me. This is one of the most unique landscapes in our country and a fairly lightly visited national park. The park is enormous from end to end, there is really no way to see it all in just one day. The night sky here is incredible due to the lack of light pollution.

-Jack Eastes, Google

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Beautiful views, Dante's View was stellar

Easy drive through park, 4 of the 5 sites visited were little or no walk from parking lots. No cell service, so plan route ahead of time and/or download or bring map. Very hot in summer, bring ample water. Beautiful views, Dante's View was stellar.

-Chris Karjanis, Google

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The night sky here is incredible

The seclusion and remoteness in this park are amazing to me. This is one of the most unique landscapes in our country and a fairly lightly visited national park. The park is enormous from end to end, there is really no way to see it all in just one day. The night sky here is incredible due to the lack of light pollution.

-Jack Eastes, Google

Map and Directions

The main road transecting Death Valley National Park from east to west is California Highway 190.

On the east in Nevada, U.S. Route 95 parallels the park from north to south with connecting highways at Scotty's Junction (State Route 267- Access closed until further notice), Beatty (State Route 374), and Lathrop Wells (State Route 373).
The most direct route from Las Vegas is via Pahrump, NV, and California Highway 190.

Coming from the west, State Route 14 and U.S. Route 395 lead to Ridgecrest, CA where State Route 178 heads east into the park. Further north on Hwy 395 at Olancha, CA you can join Hwy 190 to the park, or north of that at Lone Pine, CA, Hwy 136 will also join Hwy 190 heading east into the park.

South of the park, Interstate 15 passes through Baker, California on its way from Los Angeles to Las Vegas. State Route 127 travels north from Baker to Shoshone and Death Valley Junction with connections to the park on State Route 178 from Shoshone and connection with California Highway 190 at Death Valley Junction.

Map and Directions

The main road transecting Death Valley National Park from east to west is California Highway 190.

On the east in Nevada, U.S. Route 95 parallels the park from north to south with connecting highways at Scotty's Junction (State Route 267- Access closed until further notice), Beatty (State Route 374), and Lathrop Wells (State Route 373).
The most direct route from Las Vegas is via Pahrump, NV, and California Highway 190.

Coming from the west, State Route 14 and U.S. Route 395 lead to Ridgecrest, CA where State Route 178 heads east into the park. Further north on Hwy 395 at Olancha, CA you can join Hwy 190 to the park, or north of that at Lone Pine, CA, Hwy 136 will also join Hwy 190 heading east into the park.

South of the park, Interstate 15 passes through Baker, California on its way from Los Angeles to Las Vegas. State Route 127 travels north from Baker to Shoshone and Death Valley Junction with connections to the park on State Route 178 from Shoshone and connection with California Highway 190 at Death Valley Junction.

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